This isn’t my usual post. I am even hesitating as I write this. To be honest I am really struggling with this and don’t know what to do? As most of you know I live in Los Angeles. We happen to have the largest homeless population in the country, with an estimated 58,000 people living on the streets. Many say that the number is much higher. I have spent time on Skid Row, I have fed the homeless and interviewed a number of people who run shelters and nonprofits that support homelessness.  I have a confession to make; not even my teenage sons can make me feel as many human emotions in a flash as someone that is homeless.

When I walk by and see someone who is barefoot, cold, suffering and hungry my immediate reaction is empathy, sadness, then guilt at why do I have so much when someone has so little? Anger, helplessness and most of all frustrated. I have been advised by the Executive Directors of many of these nonprofits that the best way to help the homeless is to help the organizations that support homelessness and not to give money or food…both of which I used to do.

I went to the bank yesterday, where we have a regular homeless man who hangs out by the ATM. I walked by him on my way to the ATM and he says, “Oh good, here is someone who can help.” I smiled and said hello, went to the ATM, looked at him again and told him to have a nice day. His reply, “Look Mrs. big shot can’t share.” I got into my car and started to cry. Tears of frustration, tears of sadness, anger and a host of emotions surged through me. I thought about rolling down the window and giving him money and or an earful about how I serve but what good would that have done? Nothing,  but this encounter really made me think.

 

I drove away feeling dejected and helpless. I really have no answers just a million questions. How do we as a society address mental illness and help those suffering that can not help themselves? How do we get those suffering from addiction to the places that can treat them? How do we support families or individuals who live paycheck to paycheck that had one bad moment that spiraled into homelessness?

I honestly do not have the answers but watching people suffer is difficult. I want to help. I want to make a difference but the struggle with all these feelings is real. This is honest, not so politically correct but how I feel. Am I the only one? Do you feel the same way? Maybe I am the only one crazy enough to say it out loud and in writing…

 

I write this from the comfort of my warm home. I have never been hungry or without a pillow, a warm and safe placed to lay my head at night. I have never been without love, family or a job. I am blessed, aware of how fortunate and full of gratitude. I also know that we must do better for those who so desperately need our help. But how? Again, no answers but so many questions. I would love to hear how you feel?

Charity Matters.

 

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2 Comments

  1. Heidi, thanks for this heartfelt and honest article. I agree with the advice of organizations that it’s probably not wise to give money to a homeless individual unless you know he or she is not struggling with an addiction. I do, however, believe that giving a homeless individual food, clothing and other material goods that help them survive while engaging in conversation with them is the humane thing to do. One of the struggles the homeless have is feeling that people are indifferent to them and don’t care. It makes them feel invisible. Taking time to ask an individual his or her name and inquiring about his or her needs then doing something, even if it’s a small gesture, helps meet a homeless individual’s need for human connection because many of them struggle with loneliness and social isolation. Kind regards, Mike

    • charitymatters Reply

      Mike, thank you for your thoughtful reply. I just realized that I had not responded, my apologies. I do believe in your kindness and humanity, especially when it comes to the simple gift of acknowledging someone rather than to ignore. So much easier said than done sometimes and when encountering mental illness. Each person presents a new opportunity to find compassion and hopefully a path to humanity.

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