Tag

Make a difference

Browsing

Earth Day

“It seems to me that the natural world is the greatest source of excitement; the greatest source of visual beauty; the greatest source of intellectual interest. It is the greatest source of so much in life that makes life worth living.” David Attenborough

I think I have shared with you before that my Dad was in the recycling business, long before it was hip. He started recycling in the mid 1960s and spent his entire career recycling. This week my husband started a new job and will also be in the recycling business, in a different way, but his new business is truly based on protecting our earth. Since this Sunday is Earth Day, I have been thinking a lot more about our environment lately.

We were raised to recycle, not pollute and to respect our planet. That being said, we grew up at time in LA with smog alerts and our lungs hurting after swimming outside on summer afternoons from the pollution. While smog has improved in LA in the past few decades, pollution and litter seems to be at an all time high. Scientist are saying that by 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in our oceans. How devastating is that?  It is statistics like these that really make you think more about our planet and what we can do to protect it and why this year’s theme is End Plastic Pollution.

What began in 1970 by one man, John McConnell, has gone global in the best possible way.  On the first Earth Day, 20 million Americans came out to peacefully to demonstrate about environmental reform. This year over 192 countries and close to a billion people will celebrate Earth Day, making it the largest secular holiday in the world. We have come along way in these past few decades but still have much work to do.

My pledge to Earth Day is that I am going to start using my reusable metal water bottle and cut back on bottled water. A small step but if we all just make one tiny adjustment then our united impact can be significant. We all love this beautiful planet we call home.  Now, its time to take care of Mother earth. Happy Earth Day!

charity matters.

 

Copyright © 2018 Charity Matters. This article may not be reproduced without explicit written permission; if you are not reading this in your newsreader, the site you are viewing is illegally infringing our copyright. We would be grateful if you contact us.

February is all about heart….

It is February and National Heart Month, tomorrow is Valentine’s Day and for next 48 hours the world will be full of hearts, candy, paper and real ones. This is the time of year when we think about love and what our hearts do and it is also a time to take a pause and think about what happens when our hearts are broken?

One out of 110 children will be born this year with congenital heart disease, over 40,000 children. What does that look like for those families? Over the years I have met a number of these resilient, brave and courageous parents and each one inspires me with their passion and commitment to their child. Their journeys are extraordinary and as a result so are these miraculous children who come through this, like dear Max Page we discussed  last week.

On Thursday, we will meet Lisa Knight, a pediatric nurse who has been working with thousands of these amazing children. Her story and nonprofit will melt your heart. Until then, feel that beating heart of yours, be grateful for your health, all of the love in your life and be sure to share the love wherever you can. The world will be better today because of you.

Charity Matters.

 

Sharing is caring, if you are so moved or inspired, we would love you to share this to inspire another.

Copyright © 2018 Charity Matters. This article may not be reproduced without explicit written permission; if you are not reading this in your newsreader, the site you are viewing is illegally infringing our copyright. We would be grateful if you contact us.

The Happiness Projects

A few years back there was a book called The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin that spent over two years on the New York Times bestseller list. The author had an epiphany that she wasn’t happy and didn’t spend enough time doing things that brought her joy. The result was a year long journey exploring her happiness and a bestselling book on the topic.

I have been following an amazing group on Instagram called by the same name but in no relation to the book. A few times a week I come across beautiful images of happy people doing service projects from feeding the homeless on skid row in Los Angeles, bringing brown bag lunches, visiting senior homes with flowers repurposed from other events (even plucked from Rose Parade floats) and the list goes on. So finally, my curiosity got the best of me and I reached out to find out who was behind The Happiness Projects?

The answer, a joy filled young woman named Ivy Luong, whose passion is to bring happiness to others. An event planner by day and philanthropist in every spare moment in between. I talked to Ivy earlier this week about what inspires someone with a full-time job, a full life and tons of friends to create a group that serves others? I think you will find her answers as inspiring as I did.

Charity Matters: What inspired you to start The Happiness Projects?

Ivy Luong: I have always felt grateful for all that I have. I am a first generation American and have watched my parents work so hard for our family. I know that there are so many people in need. Last January, I reached out to a bunch of my friends to see if they wanted to volunteer. I made it easy, fun and we called it The Happiness Project. I never thought a year later what we would accomplish.

Charity Matters: So what has your impact been in just 365 days?

Ivy Luong: We didn’t set out with a goal, we simply wanted to show people (the homeless, the elderly) that someone cares. We just wanted to help empower as many people as possible. I reached out to a few friends and a few nonprofits that I cared about and before I knew it there were more friends and more causes. Last year we completed 18 projects, had over 115 volunteers and delivered happiness to 1, 666 people.

Charity Matters: What fuels you to keep doing this work and when do you know you have made a difference?

Ivy Luong: All the people I meet. Bringing strangers together to do good. The interaction from the people we serve. Our lunch bag project on Skid Row, for example, when you feed someone who hasn’t eaten in days and they smile at you when you give them food. It not only makes you realize that their hurdles in life are bigger than your own but more than that it compels you to move forward to the next project.

Knowing that if I can help just one person, that’s when I know I have made a difference.

Charity Matters: What life lesson have you learned from The Happiness Projects? And how has this year of service changed you?

Ivy Luong: I have learned big lessons. First, is that you never know what someone is going through . More than that, give back whenever you can. Connecting people, opportunities and causes  has been one of the greatest experiences, not only for me but for everyone involved.  Just knowing you have helped one person let alone hundreds is what The Happiness Projects is all about.

Charity Matters.

 

Sharing is caring, if you are so moved or inspired, we would love you to share this to inspire another.

Copyright © 2018 Charity Matters. This article may not be reproduced without explicit written permission; if you are not reading this in your newsreader, the site you are viewing is illegally infringing our copyright. We would be grateful if you contact us.

A Year Full of Surprises

I hope everyone had a wonderful Christmas holiday and time with friends and family. As I begin to look back at this past year, I am truly inspired by the incredible people I have met and the amazing journey that Charity Matters continues to be. The surprises constantly take my breath away. Yesterday, I received one that has truly left me in awe.

I have been called many things in my life but being named a Woman Warrior of 2017, by HoopLaHa is truly an unexpected  honor. HoopLaHa highlights Good News Only, and we are kindred spirits of sorts in telling stories of people making our world better. So, to be mentioned in the same breath as Annette Ross, author of  Where Fairy Tales Go and Karen Shayne of the nonprofit,  Women Survivors Alliance is beyond humbling.

As we begin looking back at 2017, I can say that I am proud of the work we are doing at Charity Matters. Grateful to each of you for following, subscribing, sharing and knowing that our world needs heroes and people to show us the way. These non-profit founders are my heroes and it is such a privilege to be considered amongst them as Woman Warrior of 2017.

Charity Matters.

 

Sharing is caring, if you are so moved or inspired, we would love you to share this to inspire another.

Copyright © 2017 Charity Matters. This article may not be reproduced without explicit written permission; if you are not reading this in your newsreader, the site you are viewing is illegally infringing our copyright. We would be grateful if you contact us.

Charity Matters Quotes

“Act as if what you do makes a difference.  It does.”

  William James

Have a great weekend! And remember….

Charity Matters.

Copyright © 2012 Charity Matters. This article may not be reproduced without explicit written permission; if you are not reading this in your newsreader, the site you are viewing is illegally infringing our copyright. We would be grateful if you contact us.

Share this:

Why I give

Here in LA, its benefit season. The days are now brighter, longer, the invitations and donation letters begin to pile up in the mail box. With all of the fun and fundraising comes the hours of work and volunteering. Each charity benefit takes hundreds of hours of volunteers to raise funds for the causes that mean so much.

With days spent stuffing envelopes, coordinating logistics from garden tours to fashion shows and everything in between I recently found myself saying why am I doing this? Why do I volunteer? Why do I give?

The answer came to me unexpectedly the other night after a long day of meetings. I was heading to Childrens Hospital Los Angeles for the launch of the Junior Ambassador program, that I am Co-Chairing. I was tired and questioning myself until I heard Manny Hernandez speak.

His story reminded me. Why.

 (click here) video?id=8257849

Manny spoke about his 10-year-old son, Manny III and how he had been a patient at CHLA off and on most of his life. He spoke of his excitement in being able to actually build the new hospital building (he is a construction worker) where his son spent so much time. His pride in both the building and his son were evident. Manny talked about little Manny wanting to be a nurse since he had always been a patient.

When he told us that little Manny died this past December, that his dream of being a nurse wasn’t going to happen but his sisters were studying to carry on that dream well, we all fell apart. This brave and loving Dad sharing his story and love for the hospital and all it had done for his family. It was so real, so beautiful, so brave and so exactly why it is …. we do what we do.

At the end of the day whether it is a stuffed envelope, a phone call, an invitation, a donation, it is all about the people’s lives that we touch. It is those moments when brave men like Manny Hernandez share their pride in giving that makes you realize that everything we do matters. Charity Matters.

Copyright © 2012 Charity Matters. This article may not be reproduced without explicit written permission; if you are not reading this in your newsreader, the site you are viewing is illegally infringing our copyright. We would be grateful if you contact us.


See whats hatching in Boston

Since its summer time our family is heading east this week to Boston. I asked a friend from Boston if there is any cause dear to her heart that I should see, her response, One Hen.Org

Truly a great story about a few women taking their children’s book, One Hen, and turning the book’s message of microfinance into a real life non-profit.  The book is a story of a West African boy who receives a loan to buy a hen and becomes an entrepreneur in the process. It is the story of one person creating change for himself, then his family and ultimately for his community.

The beauty of this real life story is how one book, one message and one author can create change for thousands of children.

Click here to see for yourself.

True life imitating art in the most beautiful way.

Copyright © 2011 Charity Matters. This article may not be reproduced without explicit written permission; if you are not reading this in your newsreader, the site you are viewing is illegally infringing our copyright. We would be grateful if you contact us.

Charity Profile: Theresa Gartland

“If you want to be remembered, do something memorable.”

Charity Matters wants you to get to know these inspirational people that will be remembered for their remarkable gifts of compassion to those in need. Theresa Gartland is exactly that, remarkable Here are her answers to Charity Matter’s Questionnaire.

What Charity Matters to you?

Urban Compass, of course!

What or who inspires you?

My students inspire me everyday!  Even though they live in a very violent and depressing neighborhood, they are the most resilient, positive, happy children I have ever met. They have a thirst for knowledge and a strong desire to succeed; they cherish every moment they are at Urban Compass.  They are risk takers – they want to explore and you can feel their excitement the minute they step into the UC van because they know they are going on an adventure they have never been on, exploring a new community, learning more about what life has to offer.  They don’t take for granted what for most of us are everyday experiences.

When did you realize that you made a difference?

It’s in the little moments that you realize you are making a difference in these children’s lives. It’s when they give you a hug and hold you tight and won’t let go.  It’s when you see them quietly working on their homework, striving to be their best.  It’s when a student says, “Thanks Ms. G- I want to be a good person when I grow up and stay out of trouble, just like you.”  When a teacher, principal or parent let’s me know the student’s math or reading scores are improving because of Urban Compass.  It’s when I get home at night and reflect on the day, thinking about the smiles I saw, the laughter I heard, and the hugs I received; and the tears I cry are coming from a place of compassion, knowing that we have provided a place for these children to create positive childhood memories that they wouldn’t have otherwise.

If you could get everyone to do one small act of kindness, what would it be?

I don’t know if this is an act of kindness but a small thing we all can do is to validate each other more.  Whether you are 8, 28, or 48 years old, you still want to hear that you are doing the right thing, that you are a good person, and that you are making good decisions in life. I see it all the time with the students I work with:  they want approval, they want recognition, and they want to know that they are ok.  I am constantly looking each one of them in the eyes and saying “I’m proud of you!”  Those words are so powerful, so meaningful.  The students respond with a smile and you can see new confidence in their eyes.  We don’t tell our friends, partners, spouses, children, parents, students, and co-workers often enough that we are proud of them.

What is your motto?

“The best thing you can do is help those who want to be helped.”

Copyright © 2011 Charity Matters. This article may not be reproduced without explicit written permission; if you are not reading this in your newsreader, the site you are viewing is illegally infringing our copyright. We would be grateful if you contact us.

Urban Compass

With over 1.8 million non-profits in the United States alone, I thought where do you begin? For me Urban Compass is a place close to my heart and a place that gives children a beginning, a hope and pays everything forward.

Located in Watts, an economically depressed area known for its high drop out rates, poverty, crime and gang violence…which triples in the hours following school. The local elementary and middle schools are recruiting grounds for new gang members with some children joining as early as eight years old.

Urban Compass was formed in partnership with Verbum Dei High School and 112th Street Elementary School to combat poverty and violence and make a difference in the lives of children in Watts. This incredible after school program captures children at a very volatile age and offers an alternative model for them: an environment that challenges them to dream of a rewarding future where they can accomplish anything and escape poverty.

Urban Compass is featured in Daughtry’s video “What About Now” (at aprox 2min) you will see that Urban Compass is the path to now.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roDXSHSEuoo&ob=av2e]

Copyright © 2011 Charity Matters. This article may not be reproduced without explicit written permission; if you are not reading this in your newsreader, the site you are viewing is illegally infringing our copyright. We would be grateful if you contact us.